Dave Gardner’s Top 10 2011 Predictions

December 29, 2010

1.       Demand for products co-created with manufacturers will see double-digit growth.

2.       Business applications will rapidly move off-premise to the cloud as companies look for ways to cut costs and move away from non-core business functions.

3.       Public and private sector will drive tremendous growth in companies that offer innovation and idea management solutions.

4.       More and more business applications will be optimized for mobile. [What works well on a laptop doesn’t necessarily work well on a smartphone.]

5.       Microsoft’s market share will further diminish as less costly and less disruptive alternatives for business productivity software are adopted by public and private sector organizations.

6.       90% of the firms that exhibited at Demo Fall 2010 Conference won’t be in business by the end of 2011.

7.       Companies that ignore social media do so at their own peril—there’s much to be gleaned from what’s being said about your company.

8.       Windows Phone 7 and HP’s WebOS fail to gain market traction against Google Android and Apple iOS smartphones.

9.       Google will continue it acquisition binge.

10.   Dell will take market share from HP and be at the top of the leader board.

-and- (drum roll please)

11.   Sarah Palin will finally reveal if she is running for President of the United States.

Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting All Rights Reserved

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Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 27DEC10

December 27, 2010

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus:  leadership

There is a lot of noise in our world and too many negative prognostications in our lives. The media keeps us fixated on drama and trauma with respect to war, our economic standing in the world, our personal economic security, mankind’s injustice to others, political infighting, etc.

I saw a banner hanging in our church on Christmas Eve that bore a message worth pondering:

Dwell on Possibility

Dwelling on the possibility that we don’t have to be at war, we don’t have to worry about our economic standing in the world, we don’t have to worry about our personal economic security, we don’t have to dwell on mankind’s injustice to others, and we don’t have to dwell on political infighting brings hope for something quite different than the media wants us to focus on.

We don’t have to idly sit back and accept a fate that is less than what we want. We aren’t helpless—we aren’t tied to the railroad tracks waiting for the next train to pull into the station.

Dwelling on possibility that your world can be what you want it to be will help you and your business thrive. Dwell on possibility.

Thought for the week:

“Man, without this wisdom, is a creature of circumstances, tossed about by every man’s opinion.” – Phineas Parkhurst Quimby

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

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Heathrow Airport Operator BAA Airports Ltd. enters Business Execution Hall of Shame

December 22, 2010

Heathrow Airport travelers are suffering horribly as a result of some bad weather this past weekend. This has negatively impacted the holidays for tens of thousands of people.  London Heathrow is the world’s largest airport hub.

Facts:

  • The airport received 3.5 inches of snow this past Saturday.  [Chicago O’Hare and Boston would consider this a “dusting of snow.”] Cold and ice that followed have snarled airport operations for days.
  • Until December 23rd at 6 a.m. local time, Heathrow will operate only 1/3 of scheduled flights.
  • Heathrow canceled 752 flights–389 arrivals and 363 departures (58%)—on Tuesday out of 1300 flights planned for that day.
  • Gatwick airport canceled only 50 out of 695 (7%) flights scheduled on Tuesday.
  • Since the snow storm on Saturday, Heathrow has canceled 3200 flights (60% of the total) whereas Gatwick as canceled 25% of its flights.
  • Heathrow had 100 contractors clearing snow; Gatwick had 140 contractors working around the clock
  • Heathrow’s second main runway remained closed all day Tuesday
  • The airport’s operator declined an offer of assistance from the military to help with snow and ice removal.

Excuses:

  • Heathrow operates at nearly full capacity making it difficult to clear the snow. [Really?]
  • Planes froze to their parking stands—special equipment was required to free the aircraft.
  • This is the coldest December on record in the southern U.K.—they are not used to such conditions.

While there is little that can be done to prevent weather events, BAA Airports has shown little imagination  in getting the airport back to normal operations.

BAA does not have a sense of urgency expected for a world travel hub to get flight operations back to normal.

BAA did not have contingency plans or resources in place for a relatively minor weather event that ensued creating horrible implications for people traveling through Heathrow.  The weather event is a smoke screen for a massive business execution failure.

I fervently hope that all who have been inconvenienced by this debacle will reach their destinations in time to celebrate the holidays.

For business execution failures and the disruptions to holiday travel of tens of thousands of people, the airport operator, Ferrovial SA’s BAA Airports Ltd., is entered into Gardner & Associates Consulting’s Business Execution Hall of Shame.

Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting All Rights Reserved


Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 20DEC10

December 20, 2010

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus:  leadership

Karen Quintos, Chief Marketing Officer for Dell, encourages all professionals to spend time in customer service getting closer to real customers and the issues they face. Karen believes that the perspective gained in customer service is invaluable as an individual’s career evolves.

Getting closer to the customer will help you and your company thrive!

Happy Holidays!

Thought for the week:

“Never mistake motion for action.” – Ernest Hemingway

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

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Taxis, The Austin Capital MetroRail and Freezing Cold

December 14, 2010

I had to make a trip to Austin, Texas, for 3 days of meetings at Dell headquarters.  Much to my chagrin, there were no rental cars available anywhere in the greater Austin area on Wednesday, December 8th.  Amy at the Driskill Hotel tried valiantly to find me a car rental but to no avail.

A round-trip limo or executive car would have been about $200 round-trip, not very appealing at that price point. Amy told me about a fairly new train service—the Capital MetroRail—from downtown Austin that would get me near the Dell campus where I could grab a cab and be on my way.  The last train north was to leave at 7:17 a.m. and get me to the Howard stop by 8 a.m.  What did I have to lose?

It was cold on that Wednesday morning—about 38 degrees with a brisk wind downtown. Rather than walk from the hotel to the train station, I decided to grab a taxi at 6:45 am.  I showed the taxi driver the map of where I needed to go carefully drawn by Amy.

My Haitian cab driver—someone who had lived in Austin for 18 years—couldn’t find the train departure point.  He stopped and asked other cabbies what they knew and they were unable to offer any assistance.  One guy sent us on a wild goose chase.  Long story short, my “4-block cab ride” cost me $20, got me to the train with one minute to spare.  Not fun!

I tried to purchase a round-trip ticket but the ticket dispenser didn’t seem to work.  I told the train driver I’d buy a round-trip ticket later and he said,  “Jump on.”  I had nearly missed the last train from Austin heading towards Round Rock.

Another woman who just happened to work for Dell Financial Services got on the train with me.  It was her first experience on the Capital MetroRail as well.  The train was terrific:  clean, efficient and on-time.

Much to my chagrin, there were no cabs waiting at the train station.  The wind was blowing about 20 miles per hour and we were freezing to death in the cold.  There was really no wind or weather shelters at the Howard station.  We tried not so successfully to hide behind the ticket dispensing machine but it offered little relief from the swirling winds. My light sports coat and slacks offered no relief from the cold.

The Dell employee tried to get us cabs via Austin Cab.  The dispatcher had no idea where to pick us up.  She said we had to provide a street address—there was no street address for us to find at the Howard train station. We searched our smart phones looking for an address and finally gave that to her.  We needed 2 cabs.  She could offer no insight about when the cabs might arrive.  It was cold—really cold!

After about 45 minutes, the first taxi arrived.  A city bus appeared and, because I still had no commitment about when a cab would arrive, I decided to jump on the bus to anywhere just to get out of the cold.  The driver told me he would take me to a major shopping center where I could find a place to get a cab.  I had to walk probably one-half mile in the cold.

The first place I came to was a Chili’s restaurant.  I knew it was too early to be open, but, I thought I might be able to persuade someone to let me in, get a street address and some shelter from the cold.  I was wrong. The lone worker must have thought this nattily attired guy was a robber.  I’m stuck in the cold with the swirling wind.

I called the dispatcher at Austin Cab, told her I’m standing outside a Chili’s restaurant at a major mall called the “Shops at Tech Ridge.”  The dispatcher has no idea where I am.  She asks for a street address.  I see a street number on the building but have no idea of the actual address.  I’m stymied again.  Did I tell you it was cold—really cold?  She finally finds a cabbie who knows where I am and, 45 minutes after leaving the bus, I’m in a cab and on my way to Dell.

I left the hotel at 6:45 am and arrived at 9:35 am at Dell for my 10 a.m. meeting. $40 in cab fares plus a $6 round-trip train fare.

So, what are the lessons learned about this business execution failure?

o         The Austin Capital MetroRail needs to make sure it has visible street addresses at all of its stops.  This is critical for cab companies, emergency dispatchers, etc.

o         The Austin Capital MetroRail needs to provide shelter from the weather for its customers. I really suffered in the cold that morning.

o         The Austin Capital MetroRail needs to reach out to any support systems, e.g., cab companies, etc., to make sure those support systems know where the stops are.  It would be great if contact information was available at each stop for any support systems that might be useful.

o         Cab dispatchers need to know the area they support.  The traveling public doesn’t know the area well.

Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com


Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 13DEC10

December 13, 2010

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus:  leadership

I attended the grand opening of Dell’s Social Media Listening Command Center in Round Rock, Texas.  Manish Mehta, Vice President for Social Media & Community, led the effort to create this critical function.  The grand opening marks a significant milestone, so significant that Michael Dell and other key executives participated in the grand opening.

I asked Manish if this milestone was consistent with his vision. He responded, “Yes for version 1.0, but, I have a vision out through 9.0.”

I love his answer.  He pauses to celebrate this milestone knowing that the journey is not complete. A long-term vision helps Manish and his team thrive.

Thought for the week:

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” – Mahatma Gandhi

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Dave Gardner is a management consultant, speaker and blogger who resides in Silicon Valley. He helps companies resolve business execution problems to accelerate collaboration and ignite excitement. He can be reached through his website at http://www.gardnerandassoc.com or via phone at +1 888-488-4976. Follow him on Twitter @Gardner_Dave.


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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.


Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 06DEC10

December 6, 2010

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus:  business execution

My superb traditional Chinese medicine acupuncturist and herbalist, Dr. Mark Wilson, helps me when I am ill. It is his job to identify and clear what we kiddingly refer to as “stuck qi (chee),” a blockage in an energy system or meridian impacting the health of the entire body. Boeing and Airbus might benefit from his services.

The new Boeing 787 test flights are on hold pending understanding why there was a fire in a power distribution unit. This is an example of “stuck qi”–the whole system is out of service until this problem is understood.

An Airbus 380 suffered a catastrophic failure of a Rolls-Royce engine shortly after take-off that, amazingly, did not result in the plane crashing. Until the design problem in the Rolls-Royce engine is identified and corrected, this is an example of “stuck qi.” Some airlines prudently grounded their fleets while the investigation continues.

We see choke points or blockages in systems and processes all the time yet “learn to live with it.” This is not a best practice.

Companies that thrive identify and clear potential blockages or choke points in systems and processes to ensure health. Unstick that qi!

Thought for the week:

“Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.” – John Wooden

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2010 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.