What Is Core To Your Business?

September 28, 2015

 

execution-vs-strategy2In this past week’s Wall Street Journal Today’s Top Supply Chain and Logistics from WSJ, I see this interesting tidbit:

Coca-Cola Co. is overhauling its U.S. supply chain. The WSJ’s Mike Esterl and Chelsey Dulaney report that the beverage giant will sell all nine of its production plants in the country and consolidate the business with three large bottling partners.

The move extends a redrawing of its distribution system that Coke began in 2013, when the company began getting rid of warehouses and delivery trucks. The idea is to get out of managing production and distribution so the company can focus more completely on what Coke says is its core business—selling the beverage concentrate and marketing the drinks.

That may create some opportunity for new logistics partners, but Coke says it still expects the bottlers to operate as “one highly aligned” unit.

Interesting but not surprising. Will Coca-Cola maintain the product execution control they have enjoyed over the years? That will be the real test of this change in strategy. This strategy appears to be sound.

Thought for the week:

“Whenever or wherever dignity is denied, we’re called to care…and we’re called to work to change” —U.S. Vice President Biden at the Global Citizen Festival

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What do you think? I welcome your comments!
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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2015 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  This posting is based on my weekly “Thank God It’s Monday” that helps you and your company thrive! To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.

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Driving Better Execution of Strategy

March 17, 2014

Note: This posting is based on my weekly “Thank God It’s Monday” that helps you and your company thrive!

This week’s focus: strategy versus execution

What’s more important: strategy or execution? They are equally important. Here’s what we know anecdotally:

  • Too many companies have poor execution of their strategy.
  • We seldom hear about companies with great execution and a poor strategy.

Many top executives see their role as setting strategy. Yet, they are too trusting that their strategy will be properly executed by their teams.

The problem stems from not aligning the teams with the strategy and holding people accountable for executing their portion of the strategy. Poor execution of a great strategy leads to disappointment or worse.

The business world is littered with executives who had great strategic intentions but could not drive actual execution. This is an age-old business problem.

Are you interested in accelerating your growth? Call me so we have a discussion about a process and tools that can help you and your company thrive at strategy execution.

Thought for the week:

“The cost of being wrong is less than the cost of doing nothing”  – Seth Godin
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What do you think? I welcome your comments!
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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2013 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.

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Strategy Execution Failures

June 3, 2013

Note: This posting is based on my weekly “Thank God It’s Monday” that helps you and your company thrive!

This week’s focus: strategy

Strategy execution failures can be attributed to many things. I consider these to be among the top reasons:

  • No strategy buy-in from leadership team
  • No accountability on the execution side–everyone responsible/no one responsible
  • Team celebrates strategy definition, not the execution and delivery of the strategy.
  • Team sees strategy as a periodic discussion, not part of the day-to-day journey
  • No follow-through–no plan to deliver the outcomes required by the strategy
  • Urgent matters trump important
  • Too many initiatives with conflicting priorities owned by the same people

Strategy must be executed to have the chance to be effective. How else can you thrive?

Thought for the week:

“Don’t start your victory dance on the 20-yard line.”  – Vickie Sullivan

What do you think? I welcome your blog comments!

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting  http://www.gardnerandassoc.com
© 2013 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here. I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.
Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.

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Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 26DEC11

December 26, 2011

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus: information technology

Earlier this year, I had the pleasure of hearing Vivek Kundra, the very first Chief Information Officer of the United States government, speak at Dell World 2011.

Kundra had a thought-provoking story to share of the need for innovative thinking and reinvention across the the U.S. government in terms of I.T. systems and solutions. [Please read this fascinating story in my Forbes.com guest blog post here.]

Michelle Bailey, Vice President at IDC, an industry analyst firm, offers “Kundra is a great example of how the future CIO needs to set a strategy and change the people, not just the technology.”

Vivek Kundra asked the tough questions that needed to be asked and took action. What tough questions are you asking to help you and your company thrive?

Thought for the week:

“Vision without execution is daydreaming.” – Bill Gates

What do you think? I welcome your blog comments!

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting

http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2011 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.


Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 03OCT11

October 3, 2011

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus: strategy

Focus on the wrong things can be debilitating. Too many people are focused on matters they have no control over. If this was a good thing, I’d not be writing about it.

We don’t have control over the stock market, what then banks are doing, what the government is doing, what’s going on in the global economy, what our competitors are doing, etc.

What we do have control over is setting our own strategy and executing that strategy, irrespective of all the ambiguities that we are exposed to.

We have to manage our businesses.  If that means we need to turn off the news so we can focus, then so be it.

We must set a certain course and follow it, not become a rudderless ship being tossed about in a turbulent sea.  This is key to thriving.

Thought for the week:

“Be yourself.  Everyone else is already taken.” – Oscar Wilde (by way of Raj Raheja)

What do you think? I welcome your blog comments!

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting

http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2011 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.


Dave Gardner’s “Thank God It’s Monday” 26SEP11

September 26, 2011

“Thank God It’s Monday” is to help companies thrive!

This week’s focus: strategy

I shared a Fast Company Expert Blog post with a client that takes a look back at the office technology available during the NASA program to put a man on the moon back during the 1960’s.

My client wondered on Twitter, “When will another president have the guts to announce a ‘man on the moon’ project and what should it be?”

I tweeted back, “The project should be to eliminate US dependence on fossil fuels by 2030…an idea bigger than putting a man on the moon.”

My client tweeted back, “…and probably with more impact on global peace ;)”

Eliminating US dependence on fossil fuels (petroleum, coal, natural gas) will improve national security, create millions of jobs, reduce our carbon footprint, and help us thrive.

Isn’t it time to tackle an innovation project like this?

Thought for the week:

“Getting change right means:

  • Bringing people together and helping them interact in ways that create meaningful engagement for new and better ways of working.
  • Tapping into a high-leverage web of experience and information so your initiative responds in real time to changing circumstances
  • Getting many, many people on board as quickly as possible, creating a fast-paced buy-in.”

– Seth Kahan, Getting Change Right


What do you think? I welcome your blog comments!

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Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting

http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2011 Gardner & Associates Consulting  All Rights Reserved

Note:  To receive an email version of “Thank God It’s Monday” to start your week, please subscribe here.  I would very much appreciate your suggesting to others that they subscribe.

Privacy Statement:  Our subscriber lists are never rented, sold, or loaned to any other parties for any reason.


Boeing 787 Certified by FAA-Lessons Learned

September 7, 2011

The Boeing 787 was certified for commercial use by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Friday, August 26th. That means the design has been put through the paces. Over 4000 exacting, discrete tests were required to be successfully passed for the FAA to certify the aircraft design.

The 787 is the first commercial aircraft with the body and wings made largely of lightweight, carbon-composite materials instead of aluminum. The expectation is that this lighter plane will consume 20% less fuel than a comparable aircraft design.

The program hasn’t been without its problems: The certification is about 3 years behind the original schedule, and cost overruns are estimated to be in the billions of dollars.

Boeing executives refused to discuss when the 787 program will be profitable. Right now, there are orders for roughly 850 planes.

Boeing decided to take a different path to bringing this aircraft to the marketplace, employing global design and supply chain resources. For one, there would be no prototype mockup built–this aircraft would be designed completely by computer. Engineering design would be distributed globally, increasing the risk that it would be difficult to collaborate and coordinate all the design elements. And finally, there would be a global supply chain that needed to be developed–787 final assembly and testing would occur in the U.S.

Most of the 787 program delay is attributed to a decentralized, global engineering strategy and a complex supply chain involving some 50 partners. These partners have had to make substantial investments in tooling and inventory under the provision that they would receive no compensation for their efforts until each aircraft is sold. The delays have to have been excruciatingly painful for Boeing’s partners.

Boeing’s CEO Jim McNerney said in a speech back on November 11, 2010:

“In retrospect, our 787 game plan may have been overly ambitious, incorporating too many firsts at once–in the application of new technologies, in revolutionary design-and-build processes, and in increasing global sourcing of engineering and manufacturing content.”

Boeing’s ultimate success in employing this global design and supply chain strategy will likely impact future aircraft design as Boeing and Airbus seek to push the risk and cost to global partners.

Let’s not forget a key aspect of this whole process. While we can applaud Boeing for getting this aircraft certified, the delays have had a significant impact on airlines determining when they can incorporate these new aircraft into their fleets.

Current estimates are that Boeing has the capacity to begin delivering ten 787 aircraft per month in 2013. Will the order backlog hold up? At present rates, it would take about 7 to 8 years to build out the current order backlog of 850 aircraft. With the projected savings available from the 787, the order backlog should increase as airlines see the opportunity to increase their fuel efficiency and modernize their fleets.

Boeing has a significant challenge ahead. We celebrate the milestone! Now, Boeing–get to work!

Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

© 2011 Dave Gardner

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