Assigning blame is the wrong approach

I just stumbled across this question on a website:

The San Diego Chargers blew a 24-0 halftime lead over the Denver Broncos on Monday night, getting outscored 35-0 after the break. Who is most to blame in San Diego today: Quarterback Philip Rivers, head coach Norv Turner or general manager A.J. Smith?

This question of “who is most to blame” is asked all too often. Who can we blame a result on? Who is ultimately responsible for what didn’t happen? Where does the buck stop?

I can think of better questions than “who is most to blame?”  How about:

  • What can we learn from what happened?
  • Where were the causes of the business execution failures?
  • How do we correct the causes of the business execution failures and ensure they don’t reoccur?

Pointing the finger to assign blame accomplishes nothing.

As the Dalai Lama teaches, “When you lose, don’t lose the lesson.”

Dave Gardner, Gardner & Associates Consulting http://www.gardnerandassoc.com

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